Diwali - Festival of Lights | National Geographic

Diwali - Festival of Lights | National Geographic

Май 19, 2010

In India, one of the most significant festivals is Diwali, or the Festival of Lights. It's a fiveday celebration that includes good food, fireworks, colored sand, and special candles and lamps.
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Diwali — Festival of Lights | National Geographic
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9:35 The 5 Most Mysterious Temples

The 5 Most Mysterious Temples

Ancient Temples Hides Within Them Thousands Of Years Of History And Mysteries...These Are The 5 Most Mysterious Temples. Please Like and SUBSCRIBE for More... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM_E7lk4AQTqYe9H2Bk9A7Q?sub_confirmation=1

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#The 7 Most Sacred Cities — https://youtu.be/4MdGdBSbyxE
#Are We Living In A Computer Simulation? https://youtu.be/3ubxQ5t0ckA
#Hinduism — Concept of Time — Origin, Nature, Units. https://youtu.be/YK-xhxrza-Y

These Mysterious Temples Were Constructed Thousands Of Years Ago With The Most Basic Tools And Equipments. However Their Grand Structures Makes One Wonder Whether It Was Possible For Early Man To Make Them. Or Were They Made By Someone Else..

The 5 Most Mysterious Hindu Temples Are:

5. Sun Temple — Konark, India

4. Brihadeeswara Temple — Tanjore, India

3. Veerabhadra Temple — Lepakshi, India

2. Shree PadmanabhaSwamy Temple — Thiruvananthapuram, India

1. Kailasa Temple — Ellora Caves, India

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3:3 Is That My Real Hand? | Breakthrough

Is That My Real Hand? | Breakthrough

Paul is put through the “rubber hand experiment” in Stockholm Sweden to better understand the “brain, body” relationship and how to extend the perception of the human body.
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7:43 Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet

Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet

Graphene is a form of carbon that could bring us bulletproof armor and space elevators, improve medicine, and make the internet run faster — some day. For the past 15 years, consumers have been hearing about this wonder material and all the ways it could change everything. Is it really almost here, or is it another promise that is perpetually just one more breakthrough away?

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0:5 Beautiful  FESTIVAL'S rangoli designs with colours

Beautiful FESTIVAL'S rangoli designs with colours

Beautiful FESTIVAL'S rangoli designs with colours by Rathod
rangoli for navratri
#rangoli
#rangolidesignswithcolours
#howtomakerangoli
#festivalrangoli
#navratrirangoli

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7:3 India: Safari - Travel Kids in Asia

India: Safari - Travel Kids in Asia

We're going wild to see some animals!
Discover the world with Travel Kids!

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2:3 The Hindu Interpretation of Creation | The Story of God

The Hindu Interpretation of Creation | The Story of God

In India, Morgan Freeman learns about the Hindu's story of creation at a shrine to Ganga.
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Today, for better or worse, the power of religion touches all of our lives, no matter what our faith. This is Morgan Freeman's journey to discover how our beliefs connect us all. This is the quest of our generation. This is the Story of God.

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6:50 Why You Wouldn't Want to Fly On The Soviet Concorde - The TU-144 Story

Why You Wouldn't Want to Fly On The Soviet Concorde - The TU-144 Story

While the Concorde is often hailed as a triumph of modern engineering, the first supersonic transport to ever fly was actually Soviet-built. The Tupolev TU-144 flew even faster than the Concorde and it carried more passengers. What happened to this aircraft and why have so few heard about it?

Getting the TU-144 built before the Concorde (and therefore proving Soviet superiority to the world) was allegedly a high priority for the Soviets. The plane was developed under a tight schedule and relied on a few less advanced aviation technologies. The TU-144 suffered three known crashes, the most famous being at the 1973 Paris Air Show (there are conflicting theories on the cause of the 1973 crash). In regular passenger service, the TU-144 proved unreliable. Only one flight a week was permitted on a single route between Moscow and Almaty, Kazakhstan. It is rumoured that Soviet leaders were nervous about the 144's airworthiness and ordered it's chief designer Alexei Tupolev to personally inspect every 144.

Supersonic travel proved expensive and could only be offered as a 'premium' product in commercial airline travel. In west, the Concorde could be marketed as a luxury product to serve the wealthy and airfares could be sold at prices well beyond typical airfares. In the communist Soviet Union, where egalitarian principles demanded that displays of wealth or class be subdued, the TU-144 airfare had to be set similar to the typical Soviet airfare. This meant that the 144 had to be operated at a loss for Aeroflot, and Aeroflot couldn't wait to stop flying it.

The TU-144 was removed from regular passenger service less than a year after it began (although cargo service was offered for a couple more years). In the 1990's, a modified version of Tu-144 was utilized by Tupolev, NASA, and other aerospace conglomerates as a research testbed for a second-generation supersonic jetliner. #Tu144 #Tupolev #Supersonic #Airplanes

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1:38 Making clay lamps or diyas for Diwali!

Making clay lamps or diyas for Diwali!

A Diya, divaa, deepa, deepam, or deepak is an oil lamp usually made from clay, with a cotton wick dipped in ghee or vegetable oils. Clay diyas are often used temporarily as lighting for special occasions, while diyas made of brass are permanent fixtures in homes and temples. Diyas are native to India, and are often used in Hindu, Sikh, Jain and Zoroastrian religious festivals such as Diwali or the Kushti ceremony. A similar lamp called a butter lamp is used in Tibetan Buddhist offerings as well. A diya placed in temples and used to bless worshippers is referred to as an aarti. Making an earthen/clay vessels is not a one day thing and one need to practise it. To make vessels from clay you will need two basic requirements which are the Spinning wheel and Clay. Here are the Instructions on how to make clay diyas:

1. Take a piece of air-drying white clay about the size of a golf ball. Mold and knead it until it is pliable and easy to work with.
2. Shape the clay into a small bowl shape, just large enough to hold a tea candle inside. Leave it round, or pinch one of the edges to make it more of a "teardrop" shape.
3. Press decorations into the sides of the clay, such as sequins, little gems and glitter. Make pretty designs all the way around.
4. Allow the clay to air dry according to instructions. When it's dry, place the tea candle in the bowl. Light your diya lamp for your Diwali celebration.

Diwali (also spelled Devali in certain regions) or Deepavali, popularly known as the "festival of lights, " is a five day festival which starts on Dhanteras (Dhantrayodashi), celebrated on thirteenth lunar day of Krishna paksha (dark fortnight) of the Hindu calendar month Ashwin and ends on Bhaubeej, celebrated on second lunar day of Shukla paksha (bright fortnight) of the Hindu calendar month Kartik. In the Gregorian calendar, Diwali falls between mid-October and mid-November. Diwali is an official holiday in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Suriname, Malaysia, Singapore and Fiji. For Hindus, Diwali is one of the most important festivals of the year and is celebrated in families by performing traditional activities together in their homes. For Jains, Diwali marks the attainment of moksha or nirvana by Mahavira in 527 BCE. Arya Samajists, celebrate this day as Death Anniversary of Swami Dayanand Saraswati. They also celebrate this day as Shardiya Nav-Shasyeshti.

The name "Diwali" or "Divali" is a contraction of "Deepavali", which translates into "row of lamps". Diwali involves the lighting of small clay lamps filled with oil to signify the triumph of good over evil. These lamps are kept on during the night and one's house is cleaned, both done in order to make the goddess Lakshmi feel welcome. Firecrackers are burst because it is believed that it drives away evil spirits. During Diwali, all the celebrants wear new clothes and share sweets and snacks with family members and friends. The festival starts with Dhanteras on which most Indian business communities begin their financial year. The second day of the festival is called the Naraka Chaturdasi. Amavasya, the third day of Diwali, marks the worship of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. The fourth day of Diwali is known as Kartika Shudda Padyami. The fifth day is referred to as Yama Dvitiya (also called Bhai Dooj), and on this day sisters invite their brothers to their homes.

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11:46 Talking about Diwali - English lesson to know all about Diwali (Vocabulary, Phrases & Expressions)

Talking about Diwali - English lesson to know all about Diwali (Vocabulary, Phrases & Expressions)

Talking about Diwali — English lesson to know all about Diwali (Vocabulary, Phrases & Expressions)

Blog : http://www.learnex.in/english-lesson-vocabulary-and-phrases-talking-about-diwali

Diwali is celebrated in India as the Festival of Lights and is one of the most important festivals of India. Indian people all over the globe celebrate this festival with great enthusiasm.
In this English lesson you will learn vocabulary related to Diwali.

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Deepawali — means a row of lights. The name Diwali evolved from Deepa — meaning lamp and vali meaning row.

Diya — means earthern oil lamp which is lit up during Diwali.

Rangoli — coloured sand designs made on the floor as part of Diwali decoration

Toran — garland of flowers used to decorate doors and vehicles

Sparklers — noiseless firecrackers that when lighted up form beautiful patterns

Crackers : fire crackers or fireworks that are burst during Diwali celebrations

Dhanteras : the day of Diwali that is celebrated by businessman as the day of starting their new financial year. Gold is also bought on this day.

Laxmi pooja — Laxmi is the Hindu goddess of prosperity and wealth.. She is worshipped through a special ceremony called pooja in order to receive her blessings

Bhai Dooj — it is a celebration of siblings where the brother is made to feel special by the sister, gifts are exchanged.

Saree — the traditional Indian garment is draped by women on Diwali

Salwar kameez — is another traditional dress worn by women on Diwali

Kurta — is the traditional garment worn by men on Diwali

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4:29 Ramayana : Story of Diwali | Mythological Stories from Mocomi Kids

Ramayana : Story of Diwali | Mythological Stories from Mocomi Kids

http://mocomi.com/ presents: Ramayana- The Story of Diwali

Diwali is a festival of joy and prosperity, and a celebration of the victory of good over evil. This is the story of Ram and Ravan. A story related to this festival.

Ramayana is the story of Lord Rama rescuing his wife Sita from the Demon King Ravana with his brother Lakshmana and an extraordinary monkey possessing special powers called Hanumana. On Lord Rama’s return after a fourteen year exile Diwali was celebrated for the first time.

Among the many mythological stories related to the festival of Diwali, is the story of Ram and Ravana, the classic story of the victory of good over evil.

Watch this video to know about the Ramayana- the story of Ram and Ravana, and the reason why Diwali is celebrated.

Diwali is a festival of joy and prosperity, and a celebration of the victory of good over evil. This is the story of Ram and Ravan. A story related to this festival.

Thousands of years ago, in the city of Ayodhya, there was a wise and good king named Dasaratha who ruled along with his three queens and four princes.

The eldest, Ram and his beautiful wife, Sita, lived happily along with his other prince brothers and their wives. But one of King Dasaratha’s wives was jealous of Ram and demanded that he be exiled to the forest for 14 years so that her son, Bharat, be made king.

Having once promised his wife to fulfil any wish of hers, the helpless king exiled Ram to the forest. And so, Ram set off on foot accompanied by his loving wife Sita, and loyal younger brother, Lakshman.

A few years into their exile, a demoness named Surpanakha saw Ram and fell for his looks. She asked Ram to marry her. Ram refused and asked her to go to Lakshman instead.

But Lakshman also refused. Enraged, Surpanakha showed her true form and Lakshman cut off her nose and ears.

The demoness went wailing to her brother who was none other than Ravan, the demon King of Lanka. Ravan was furious and swore revenge.

With the help of another demon who took the form of a golden deer, he distracted Ram and Lakshman and kidnapped Sita from their hut.

When Ram and Lakshman returned, Sita was missing! They realised that something bad had happened while they were gone and immediately rushed to find her.

On their way, they came across an army of monkeys and bears that agreed to help them. Among them was a monkey named Hanuman who had once vowed to be at Ram’s service.

Now Hanuman was no ordinary monkey. He could fly over mountains, change size at will and had super-human strength. He had the power to leap across oceans in a single stride. So obviously, he ended up being Ram’s strongest ally.

It was Hanuman who finally found Sita, imprisoned in one of Ravan’s beautiful gardens. Hanuman reassured Sita that Ram would be here soon to rescue her.

He came back to Ram with Sita’s whereabouts and the army of monkeys, bears and men marched to Lanka.

Soon, a great battle started between to two mighty armies and Ram’s soldiers managed to kill all the demons, except one – Ravan.

The battle was now between Ram and Ravan. He gave Ravan one last chance to apologise and return Sita. Ravan instead rained down weapons on him. Ram too fought back relentlessly but despite all his efforts, nothing seemed to kill Ravan. Finally, Ravan’s brother Vibheeshan told Ram that Ravan’s weakest point was in his navel. Using an arrow given to him by the gods, Ram shot Ravan in the navel and killed him instantly.

And so, Ram and his love, Sita, were finally reunited.

Soon after, upon completion of their 14 years in exile, Ram, Sita and Lakshman returned home to find the entire city waiting for them! The streets were decorated with flowers and lamps and there was happiness everywhere

And this is why every year on Diwali, you see the streets, homes and offices lit up with lamps, like the city of Ayodhya, in celebration of Ram and Sita’s homecoming.

For more information about Diwali festival, go to: http://mocomi.com/ramayana-story-of-diwali/

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